Good Grief, This Hurts: Supporting children and young people to manage the impact of death on their lives

The Good Grief, This Hurts seminar series seeks to build awareness around what to do when a child has experienced the death of a significant person in their life. This event is for anyone in the community who is caring for a child who has been impacted by death – family members and friends, teachers, guidance counsellors, health care providers, private counsellors/psychologists and community-based youth-focused organisations.

Note: Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, Good Grief, This Hurts is being delivered as a series of free virtual seminars in 2020.

Session Topic Date Time
1 The voice of children and young people Monday, 17 August 3.15pm-4.45pm
2 The voice of parents and caregivers Monday, 21 September 3.15pm-4.45pm
3 The voice of professionals Monday, 19 October 3.15pm-4.45pm
4 Pulling the threads together Monday, 16 November 3.15pm-4.45pm

Seminar one speakers

Meg is an AASW accredited clinical social worker and works in the field of paediatric palliative care, specialising in play-based counselling with bereaved siblings. Meg works at Very Special Kids, a children’s hospice and family support organisation in Melbourne. As a member of the Family Support Team, Meg works with families who have a child with a life-threatening condition providing emotional support, advocacy, end of life care, bereavement support and counselling. Meg is a PhD candidate at the University of Melbourne, researching the lived experiences of children who have had a sibling die from a life-threatening condition.
Rachel is the author of FINN’S FEATHER (Enchanted Lion, US/June 2018), inspired by her late son Hamish. Hamish passed away in 2012 at 20 1/2 months after an accident at home. Rachel attracted attention after she won a national writing competition, the My Child Short Story Competition in 2012 for a piece called ‘Honoring Hamish’. She was long-listed for the Hunter Writers Centre Grief writing competition and her piece is published in the 2013 Anthology. Rachel toured the US in 2018, promoting her picture book FINN’S FEATHER at Ci6, ALA Annual Conference and at bookstores in New Orleans, Mississippi and Alabama. She was keynote speaker at SCBWI Conference 2019 and has appeared on Studio10, in Who Magazine, and on Radio National to talk about the importance of books for grieving children. Rachel is an ex-ABC/BBC Radio Producer/Presenter.
Fraser lost his little brother Hamish when he was 3 years old. They were just 18 months apart. Fraser, along with his family, understand the importance of honouring and remembering Hamish. Fraser is now 11 years old and is passionate about rugby and percussion.
As a full-time carer to his young son Marmaduke, who had childhood cancer, Simon faced extreme circumstances when his wife also received her own terminal cancer diagnosis. After bringing his son Marmaduke home under palliative care to be with his mum, brothers and sister, Simon and his family learned to embrace the joy of living day-to-day. However, when both his wife and son both died within just weeks of each other, Simon had to draw on further internal resources to help his young family navigate the slow recovery from grief and loss. Simon speaks nationally and internationally on palliative care, grief and bereavement; speaks through simonwaring.com on finding positive ways to be present and navigate change; and works within the not-for-profit sector supporting children and families with cancer. Simon also sits on the voluntary Parents Advisory Group, supporting families within the Children’s Cancer Centre at the Melbourne Royal Children’s Hospital.

Seminar two speakers

Rachel is the author of FINN’S FEATHER (Enchanted Lion, US/June 2018), inspired by her late son Hamish. Hamish passed away in 2012 at 20 1/2 months after an accident at home. Rachel attracted attention after she won a national writing competition, the My Child Short Story Competition in 2012 for a piece called ‘Honoring Hamish’. She was long-listed for the Hunter Writers Centre Grief writing competition and her piece is published in the 2013 Anthology. Rachel toured the US in 2018, promoting her picture book FINN’S FEATHER at Ci6, ALA Annual Conference and at bookstores in New Orleans, Mississippi and Alabama. She was keynote speaker at SCBWI Conference 2019 and has appeared on Studio10, in Who Magazine, and on Radio National to talk about the importance of books for grieving children. Rachel is an ex-ABC/BBC Radio Producer/Presenter.
As a full-time carer to his young son Marmaduke, who had childhood cancer, Simon faced extreme circumstances when his wife also received her own terminal cancer diagnosis. After bringing his son Marmaduke home under palliative care to be with his mum, brothers and sister, Simon and his family learned to embrace the joy of living day-to-day. However, when both his wife and son both died within just weeks of each other, Simon had to draw on further internal resources to help his young family navigate the slow recovery from grief and loss. Simon speaks nationally and internationally on palliative care, grief and bereavement; speaks through simonwaring.com on finding positive ways to be present and navigate change; and works within the not-for-profit sector supporting children and families with cancer. Simon also sits on the voluntary Parents Advisory Group, supporting families within the Children’s Cancer Centre at the Melbourne Royal Children’s Hospital.
Nathan MacArthur is a specialist grief counsellor and accredited mental health social worker working in private practice at Sydney Grief Counselling Services. Since 2009, he has worked in oncology, palliative care and bereavement support in hospitals and NGOs. He holds an MA in Psychology (Hons), MA in social work and a graduate diploma in relationship counselling. He is currently enrolled as a part-time PhD candidate at the University of New South Wales conducting research exploring the experiences of bereaved adults.

Seminar three speakers

Nathan MacArthur is a specialist grief counsellor and accredited mental health social worker working in private practice at Sydney Grief Counselling Services. Since 2009, he has worked in oncology, palliative care and bereavement support in hospitals and NGOs. He holds an MA in Psychology (Hons), MA in social work and a graduate diploma in relationship counselling. He is currently enrolled as a part-time PhD candidate at the University of New South Wales conducting research exploring the experiences of bereaved adults.
As an accredited mental health social worker, art therapist and acceptance and commitment therapist, Kate has been providing targeted therapeutic support to children, young adults and their families over the past twelve years. Predominantly working in paediatric and young adult health, specialising in paediatric oncology, paediatric palliative care and young adult mental health. Kate spent her first few years practicing as a social worker at The Royal Children’s Hospital in Paediatric Oncology, then moving into Queensland Children’s Hospital in the Paediatric Rehabilitation Unit. After completing her Masters in mental health and art therapy, Kate established an art therapy and social work position in the Young Adult Centre at the Mater Health Service while also working with UQ on research in the efficacy of art therapy in health care. Kate runs her own private practice, Creative Understanding.
Andrea is a primary school teacher with more than 25 years’ experience within the Queensland Department of Education. While holding teaching and school leadership positions in a range of schools across Queensland, Andrea realised the immense impact that teachers can have on the lives of young people and moved into roles centred around student wellbeing. Andrea is currently the manager of Guidance Services for the Metropolitan region, striving to ensure that guidance services to schools provide comprehensive student support and wellbeing programs that are responsive to the needs of the school community. Andrea’s team provide leadership and support in responding to some of the most complex and challenging circumstances in schools, including critical incidents and the passing of students.
Shelley Bampton is an educator with a passion and commitment to the provision of quality education and experiences for students. With more than 14 years’ experience as both a classroom teacher and school leader, Shelley recognises that teachers have a very important role to play in the lives of young people. Shelley has continued to stay focussed on the ‘right’ work recognising the importance of collaboration; working with staff, students, parents and other government agencies to provide high quality programs and support. She holds a Masters – Education, Bachelor Arts, Bachelor of Education and Diploma Business Management.
Emma is a psychologist with more than twenty years’ experience working in child and youth mental health. Following the completion of a Masters in clinical psychology, she has worked across a broad range of settings including hospital outpatient, community clinics, inpatient, day program, consultation liaison and extended hours. Emma has also worked in strategic policy at a state-wide level with a focus on developing initiatives linking education and child and youth mental health. Emma was the team leader of the Mater Child and Youth Mental Health Service (CYMHS) Consultation Liaison Team and Extended Hours Service for four years and she has been managing the CYMHS Consultation Liaison Service at the Queensland Children’s Hospital since it opened in 2014. In this role Emma and her team work clinically with young people who have a primary medical condition and their families. She is also particularly interested in consumer engagement and working collaboratively with young people and families to improve service delivery.

Seminar four speakers

Nathan MacArthur is a specialist grief counsellor and accredited mental health social worker working in private practice at Sydney Grief Counselling Services. Since 2009, he has worked in oncology, palliative care and bereavement support in hospitals and NGOs. He holds an MA in Psychology (Hons), MA in social work and a graduate diploma in relationship counselling. He is currently enrolled as a part-time PhD candidate at the University of New South Wales conducting research exploring the experiences of bereaved adults.
Meg is an AASW accredited clinical social worker and works in the field of paediatric palliative care, specialising in play-based counselling with bereaved siblings. Meg works at Very Special Kids, a children’s hospice and family support organisation in Melbourne. As a member of the Family Support Team, Meg works with families who have a child with a life-threatening condition providing emotional support, advocacy, end of life care, bereavement support and counselling. Meg is a PhD candidate at the University of Melbourne, researching the lived experiences of children who have had a sibling die from a life-threatening condition.
As a full-time carer to his young son Marmaduke, who had childhood cancer, Simon faced extreme circumstances when his wife also received her own terminal cancer diagnosis. After bringing his son Marmaduke home under palliative care to be with his mum, brothers and sister, Simon and his family learned to embrace the joy of living day-to-day. However, when both his wife and son both died within just weeks of each other, Simon had to draw on further internal resources to help his young family navigate the slow recovery from grief and loss. Simon speaks nationally and internationally on palliative care, grief and bereavement; speaks through simonwaring.com on finding positive ways to be present and navigate change; and works within the not-for-profit sector supporting children and families with cancer. Simon also sits on the voluntary Parents Advisory Group, supporting families within the Children’s Cancer Centre at the Melbourne Royal Children’s Hospital.
Rachel is the author of FINN’S FEATHER (Enchanted Lion, US/June 2018), inspired by her late son Hamish. Hamish passed away in 2012 at 20 1/2 months after an accident at home. Rachel attracted attention after she won a national writing competition, the My Child Short Story Competition in 2012 for a piece called ‘Honoring Hamish’. She was long-listed for the Hunter Writers Centre Grief writing competition and her piece is published in the 2013 Anthology. Rachel toured the US in 2018, promoting her picture book FINN’S FEATHER at Ci6, ALA Annual Conference and at bookstores in New Orleans, Mississippi and Alabama. She was keynote speaker at SCBWI Conference 2019 and has appeared on Studio10, in Who Magazine, and on Radio National to talk about the importance of books for grieving children. Rachel is an ex-ABC/BBC Radio Producer/Presenter.

Good Grief, This Hurts is made possible with the support of the Children’s Hospital Foundation, QuoCCA (Quality of Care Collaborative Australia), Project ECHO and Gandel Philanthropy.

 Children’s Hospital Foundation, QuoCCA (Quality of Care Collaborative Australia), Project ECHO and Gandel Philanthropy.

Date and times

17 August , 3.15pm-4.45pm
21 September, 3.15pm-4.45pm
19 October, 3.15pm-4.45pm
16 November, 3.15pm-4.45pm

Venue

Virtual event

Cost

Free

Register your interest

Further details will be forwarded to registrants prior to each seminar.

For more information

e: QuoCCAClinEd@health.qld.gov.au