Green-spored parasol (Chlorophyllum molybdites)

Very common in lawns and garden beds, during wet periods of spring, summer and autumn, occurring in groups or fairy rings. The large caps, 10-30cm in diameter, are whitish to brown, broadly conical often with margins slightly upturned, and covered with concentric circles of pinkish-brown to chocolate-brown scales. The centre of the cap is entirely brown. The gills are free from the stem, white at first, becoming greenish when the spores mature. The base of the stem is slightly swollen whilst a prominent and movable white or brownish ring with a fringed margin is present on the stem closer to the cap. This species is easily mistaken for “edible” mushrooms and smells and tastes “mushroomy”. The most obvious feature is the greenish gills of mature caps.

Toxicity category: 1
Category 1 - Extremely toxic
Warning: Seek urgent medical attention for any ingestion.

Common name: Green-spored parasol

Botanical name: Chlorophyllum molybdites

Other common names: Green Lepiota, False parasol

Family: –

General description: Very common in lawns and garden beds, during wet periods of spring, summer and autumn, occurring in groups or fairy rings. The large caps, 10-30cm in diameter, are whitish to brown, broadly conical often with margins slightly upturned, and covered with concentric circles of pinkish-brown to chocolate-brown scales. The centre of the cap is entirely brown. The gills are free from the stem, white at first, becoming greenish when the spores mature. The base of the stem is slightly swollen whilst a prominent and movable white or brownish ring with a fringed margin is present on the stem closer to the cap. This species is easily mistaken for “edible” mushrooms and smells and tastes “mushroomy”. The most obvious feature is the greenish gills of mature caps.

Flowers: –

Leaves: –

Fruit/Berries: –

Other: –

Symptoms: Symptoms are particularly severe when the mushroom is consumed raw. Symptoms usually begin within 30 minutes to two hours and include drowsiness, severe vomiting and diarrhoea, sometimes with bleeding from the gut and significant fluid and electrolyte loss. Blue discolouration of lips, tongue and fingernails may occur. Fatalities in young children have been reported.

Toxicity category: 1
Category 1 - Extremely toxic
Warning: Seek urgent medical attention for any ingestion.

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