Arrow head plant (Syngonium)

Often seen as an indoor pot plant this species is also used as a garden specimen, where it can become an aggressive climber.
The flowers are similar to those of other species in the aroid family, consisting of a green to yellow or white spathe or sheath surrounding a spadix or spike of minute flowers.
The leaves commonly have a three lobed or parted arrangement, which can become 5 to 7-parted when mature. When the plant is grown as an indoor specimen, the leaves are most often variegated green with white.

Toxicity category: 2
Category 2 - Potentially toxic
Warning: Seek urgent medical attention if lips or tongue become swollen or if there is difficulty breathing or swallowing.

Common name: Arrow head plant

Botanical name: Syngonium species The most common species are Syngonium podophyllum, Syngonium macrophyllum.

Other common names: White butterfly, Arrowhead vine

Family: Araceae

General description: Often seen as an indoor pot plant this species is also used as a garden specimen, where it can become an aggressive climber.

Flowers: The flowers are similar to those of other species in the aroid family, consisting of a green to yellow or white spathe or sheath surrounding a spadix or spike of minute flowers.

Leaves: The leaves commonly have a three lobed or parted arrangement, which can become 5 to 7-parted when mature. When the plant is grown as an indoor specimen, the leaves are most often variegated green with white. If grown as a shaded garden specimen, the leaves can become all green rather than variegated with white. The leaves and stem can measure up to 30cm.

Fruit/Berries: –

Other: –

Symptoms: All parts of the plant contain calcium oxalate crystals. If chewed or eaten, symptoms include gastric irritation, salivation, a tingling or burning sensation of the lips, mouth, tongue and throat followed by swelling.

Toxicity category: 2
Category 2 - Potentially toxic
Warning: Seek urgent medical attention if lips or tongue become swollen or if there is difficulty breathing or swallowing.

back to poisonous plants page